A Very Ancient Craft

Preparation

Equipment

Method

Fermentation

Maturation

Consumption

Beer, Mead and so on

  1. BASIC BEER RECIPE
  2. BEN'S BEST BITTER
  3. COCK ALE
  4. STOUT
  5. MILK STOUT
  6. BROWN ALE
  7. OLD ALE
  8. MILD ALE
  9. TREACLE ALE
  10. NETTLE
  11. HONEY BEER
  12. GINGER BEER
  13. GINGER BEER 2
  14. CIDER
  15. PERRY
  16. PUNCH
  17. MEAD
  18. TABLE MEAD
  19. DESSERT MEAD
  20. SPARKLING MEAD
  21. METHEGLIN
  22. PYMENT
  23. HYPOCRAS
  24. MELOMEL
  25. CYSER

Wine Recipes

  1. GRAPEFRUIT WINE
  2. LEMON WINE
  3. ORANGE WINE
  4. PINEAPPLE WINE
  5. ROSE-HIP AND FIG WINE
  1. SPARKLING APPLE WINE
  2. SPARKLING PEAR WINE
  3. SPARKLING GOOSEBERRY WINE
  1. APPLE WINE
  2. APRICOT WINE 1
  3. APRICOT WINE 2
  4. ARTICHOKE WINE
  5. BILBERRY WINE
  6. BIRCH SAP WINE
  7. BLACKBERRY WINE
  8. BRAMBLE TIP WINE
  9. BROAD BEAN WINE
  10. CELERY WINE
  11. CHERRY WINE
  12. CYPRIOT GRAPE WINE
  13. ENGLISH GRAPE VINE
  14. GOOSEBERRY WINE
  15. HAWTHORN BERRY WINE
  16. LOGANBERRY WINE
  17. MIXED FRESH FRUIT WINE
  18. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  19. MULBERRY WINE
  20. PARSLEY WINE
  21. PEACH WINE
  22. PEACH PULP WINE
  23. PEA POD WINE
  24. PLUM WINE 1
  25. PLUM WINE 2
  26. RAISIN WINE
  27. REDCURRANT WINE
  28. RHUBARB WINE
  29. SLOE WINE
  30. SPINACH WINE
  31. TOMATO WINE
  32. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  1. APRICOT PULP WINE
  2. BANANA WINE
  3. BEETROOT WINE
  4. BLACKBERRY WINE
  5. BRANDY WINE
  6. BULLACE WINE
  7. CARROT WINE
  8. CHERRY "BRANDY"
  9. CHERRY WINE
  10. CHERRY PLUM WINE
  11. COFFEE WINE
  12. DAMSON "CREAM"
  13. DAMSON WINE
  14. DATE WINE
  15. ELDERBERRY WINE
  16. DRIED ELDERBERRY AND BILBERRY WINE
  17. FIG WINE
  18. GINGER WINE
  19. LOGANBERRY WINE
  20. MULBERRY WINE
  21. ORANGE WINE
  22. PARSNIP WINE
  23. RAISIN WINE
  24. ROSE-HIP WINE
  25. DRIED ROSE-HIP WINE
  26. SLOE WINE
  27. SULTANA WINE
  1. FLOWER WINES
  2. ALMOND WINE
  3. CRAB-APPLE WINE
  4. MAIZE WINE
  5. MANGOLD WINE
  6. MARROW WINE
  7. MEDLAR WINE
  8. MIXED FRUIT WINE
  9. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  10. PEACH WINE
  11. PEAR WINE
  12. PRUNE WINE
  13. QUINCE WINE
  14. RASPBERRY WINE
  15. RHUBARB WINE
  16. RICE AND RAISIN WINE
  17. SULTANA WINE
  18. SPICED APPLE WINE
  19. TEA WINE
  20. VINE FOLLY WINE
  21. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  22. DRIED WHORTLEBERRYWINE
  1. MARROW RUM
  2. CHOKE CHERRY
  3. BLUE BERRY
  4. APPLE WINE 1
  5. WATER MELON WINE
  6. TOMATO WINE
  7.  

 

SPARKLING WINE RECIPES

This wine should contain carbon dioxide produced by a secondary fermentation in bottle. It should be moderately strong, 12% to 13% alcohol, and if possible should be served not quite dry, that is with a specific gravity of 1.000 to 1.002. When maturation is nearly complete and the wine is bottled it should be racked into proper thick champagne bottles capable of resisting a high gas pressure and you should never use ordinary wine bottles. These could be most dangerous if they were to explode. When the wine is bottled a good teaspoonful of sugar dissolved in some of the wine should be added to each bottle, together with a few drops of a fermenting champagne yeast. Good tight-fitting cork stoppers should be used, and these should be wired down. After three months a deposit will be seen in the bottles and if your facilities permit the bottles should be daily twisted and slowly inverted until they are upside down. Alternatively they can be slowly inverted in a cardboard wine case and each day twisted and slightly shaken so that the sediment gradually falls from the side of the, bottle until it is resting on the cork.

Many people now have deep-freeze facilities and it would be a convenience to make up a freezing mixture and stand the necks of the bottles in the mixture until the sediment is frozen on to the cork. By careful manipulation the wire should be cut, the cork and sediment removed and a teaspoonful of sugar syrup added in its place; the bottle should be re-corked and re-wired as quickly as possible.

If deep-freeze facilities are not available chill the bottles as hard as possible in an ordinary refrigerator, not forgetting to keep them upside down, then remove the bottles one by one, and whilst holding the bottle still upside down, cut the wire, pull out the cork, slip your thumb over the mouth of the bottle and bring it upright. With your other hand add the sugar syrup and a fresh cork--without spilling any of the wine ! This is clearly a very highly skilled task ! In the champagne cellars it is routine, but it can be done at home and has been done efficiently by many amateur winemakers. This extra trouble means that when you serve your sparkling wine you will have no trace of sediment to spoil the appearance of the wine as you pour it into glasses. Clearly, a cloudy wine would spoil. the entire effect of the sparkling bubbles of gas in an otherwise brilliantly clear wine.

Shortly after the removal of the lees of the bottle fermentation the wine may be used. It should be served cool, that is about 55"F., so that all the bubbles do not evanesce too quickly, but not so cool that they are inhibited.