A Very Ancient Craft

Preparation

Equipment

Method

Fermentation

Maturation

Consumption

Beer, Mead and so on

  1. BASIC BEER RECIPE
  2. BEN'S BEST BITTER
  3. COCK ALE
  4. STOUT
  5. MILK STOUT
  6. BROWN ALE
  7. OLD ALE
  8. MILD ALE
  9. TREACLE ALE
  10. NETTLE
  11. HONEY BEER
  12. GINGER BEER
  13. GINGER BEER 2
  14. CIDER
  15. PERRY
  16. PUNCH
  17. MEAD
  18. TABLE MEAD
  19. DESSERT MEAD
  20. SPARKLING MEAD
  21. METHEGLIN
  22. PYMENT
  23. HYPOCRAS
  24. MELOMEL
  25. CYSER

Wine Recipes

  1. GRAPEFRUIT WINE
  2. LEMON WINE
  3. ORANGE WINE
  4. PINEAPPLE WINE
  5. ROSE-HIP AND FIG WINE
  1. SPARKLING APPLE WINE
  2. SPARKLING PEAR WINE
  3. SPARKLING GOOSEBERRY WINE
  1. APPLE WINE
  2. APRICOT WINE 1
  3. APRICOT WINE 2
  4. ARTICHOKE WINE
  5. BILBERRY WINE
  6. BIRCH SAP WINE
  7. BLACKBERRY WINE
  8. BRAMBLE TIP WINE
  9. BROAD BEAN WINE
  10. CELERY WINE
  11. CHERRY WINE
  12. CYPRIOT GRAPE WINE
  13. ENGLISH GRAPE VINE
  14. GOOSEBERRY WINE
  15. HAWTHORN BERRY WINE
  16. LOGANBERRY WINE
  17. MIXED FRESH FRUIT WINE
  18. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  19. MULBERRY WINE
  20. PARSLEY WINE
  21. PEACH WINE
  22. PEACH PULP WINE
  23. PEA POD WINE
  24. PLUM WINE 1
  25. PLUM WINE 2
  26. RAISIN WINE
  27. REDCURRANT WINE
  28. RHUBARB WINE
  29. SLOE WINE
  30. SPINACH WINE
  31. TOMATO WINE
  32. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  1. APRICOT PULP WINE
  2. BANANA WINE
  3. BEETROOT WINE
  4. BLACKBERRY WINE
  5. BRANDY WINE
  6. BULLACE WINE
  7. CARROT WINE
  8. CHERRY "BRANDY"
  9. CHERRY WINE
  10. CHERRY PLUM WINE
  11. COFFEE WINE
  12. DAMSON "CREAM"
  13. DAMSON WINE
  14. DATE WINE
  15. ELDERBERRY WINE
  16. DRIED ELDERBERRY AND BILBERRY WINE
  17. FIG WINE
  18. GINGER WINE
  19. LOGANBERRY WINE
  20. MULBERRY WINE
  21. ORANGE WINE
  22. PARSNIP WINE
  23. RAISIN WINE
  24. ROSE-HIP WINE
  25. DRIED ROSE-HIP WINE
  26. SLOE WINE
  27. SULTANA WINE
  1. FLOWER WINES
  2. ALMOND WINE
  3. CRAB-APPLE WINE
  4. MAIZE WINE
  5. MANGOLD WINE
  6. MARROW WINE
  7. MEDLAR WINE
  8. MIXED FRUIT WINE
  9. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  10. PEACH WINE
  11. PEAR WINE
  12. PRUNE WINE
  13. QUINCE WINE
  14. RASPBERRY WINE
  15. RHUBARB WINE
  16. RICE AND RAISIN WINE
  17. SULTANA WINE
  18. SPICED APPLE WINE
  19. TEA WINE
  20. VINE FOLLY WINE
  21. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  22. DRIED WHORTLEBERRYWINE
  1. MARROW RUM
  2. CHOKE CHERRY
  3. BLUE BERRY
  4. APPLE WINE 1
  5. WATER MELON WINE
  6. TOMATO WINE
  7.  

 

FLOWER WINES

Flowers contain no acid and very little tannin, their only contribution to a wine is in bouquet and flavour. The flowers should be gathered if possible on a warm sunny day, or certainly during the middle of a dry day when the florets are wide open. Only the petals or tiny flowers heads should be used; the green calixes impart a bitter flavour to the wine and should be discarded together with any stem, leaf or stalk.

In the absence of fresh flowers some winemakers have used dried flowers which are available from herbalists. As the essence of flowers becomes very concentrated when they are dried, it is only necessary to use a small packet of dried flowers to flavour a gallon of wine. The method is the same for all flower wines. Boiling water is poured on to the flower petals and the mashing vessel is carefully covered. Each day the flowers should be stirred so that they become thoroughly macerated and are not allowed to rise and become dry. After three days the liquid is strained on to some chopped sultanas or raisins and sugar, citric acid, nutrient and tannin. Fermenting yeast is added and the must is fermented in the usual way. A week later the wine is strained again and the raisins are pressed and fermentation is continued until completion. The wine is then racked, stored for three months, then racked again and three months later bottled. This wine is usually ready in about a year after making.

The basic ingredients are as follows. The quantities of flowers to use are given subsequently:

8 oz. chopped raisins or sultanas

3 Ib. sugar

1/2 teaspoonful grape tannin or 1/2 cup cold strong tea

1 gallon water

Rind and juice of 2 lemons and an orange or alternatively 3 oz, citric acid

Nutrient

General-purpose yeast

The flowers are:

Agrimony, 1 medium sized bunch

Broom, 2 quarts of broom flowers

Carnation, 2 quarts of 'white' pinks

Clover, 2 quarts of purpIe claver heads

Coltsfoot, 2 quarts coltsfoot flowers (similar to dandelions)

Cowslip, 2 quarts flowers

Dandelion, 2 quarts dandelion heads

Elderflower, 1 pint elderflower florets, pressed down

Geranium Leaf, 2 quarts of leaves (PeIargonium quercifolium variety only)

Golden Rod, 2 handfuls of blossoms

Hawthorn Blossom, 2 quarts of fresh hawthorn flowers (sometimes called May Blossom)

Marigold, 2 quarts of marigold heads

Primrose, 2 quarts fresh primroses

Oak Leaf, 2 quarts oak leaves, gathered as soon as the oak leaf is fully developed. (N.B. Omit tannin or cold strong tea)

Rose petal, 2 quarts dark red rose petals

Walnut Leaf, 1 large handful of walnut leaves. (N.B. Omit tannin or cold strong tra)

The author has tasted nearly all of these wines and made many of them. The best two are undoubtedly elderflower and rose-petal and both of these wines are well worth making. Hawthorn blossom has a magnificent bouquet comparable with rose-petal and elderflower and is a delicious wine if you can but gather the blossom. The geranium leaf has a most distinctive bouquet and flavour, which is extremely pleasant, although this little-leafed pelargonium is by no means common. Cowslip, coltsfoot and dandelion wines take longer to mature and are quite pleasant although not as good as those already mentioned. The remainder make drinkable wine although not distinguished, nor indeed worth repeating.

It would be unwise to go beyond this range of flowers, which have all been safely tested over many years. Flowers that spring from bulbs are generally poisonous and you should not make bluebell wine, tulip wine, daffodil wine and so on. This is also true of the privet flower.