A Very Ancient Craft

Preparation

Equipment

Method

Fermentation

Maturation

Consumption

Beer, Mead and so on

  1. BASIC BEER RECIPE
  2. BEN'S BEST BITTER
  3. COCK ALE
  4. STOUT
  5. MILK STOUT
  6. BROWN ALE
  7. OLD ALE
  8. MILD ALE
  9. TREACLE ALE
  10. NETTLE
  11. HONEY BEER
  12. GINGER BEER
  13. GINGER BEER 2
  14. CIDER
  15. PERRY
  16. PUNCH
  17. MEAD
  18. TABLE MEAD
  19. DESSERT MEAD
  20. SPARKLING MEAD
  21. METHEGLIN
  22. PYMENT
  23. HYPOCRAS
  24. MELOMEL
  25. CYSER

Wine Recipes

  1. GRAPEFRUIT WINE
  2. LEMON WINE
  3. ORANGE WINE
  4. PINEAPPLE WINE
  5. ROSE-HIP AND FIG WINE
  1. SPARKLING APPLE WINE
  2. SPARKLING PEAR WINE
  3. SPARKLING GOOSEBERRY WINE
  1. APPLE WINE
  2. APRICOT WINE 1
  3. APRICOT WINE 2
  4. ARTICHOKE WINE
  5. BILBERRY WINE
  6. BIRCH SAP WINE
  7. BLACKBERRY WINE
  8. BRAMBLE TIP WINE
  9. BROAD BEAN WINE
  10. CELERY WINE
  11. CHERRY WINE
  12. CYPRIOT GRAPE WINE
  13. ENGLISH GRAPE VINE
  14. GOOSEBERRY WINE
  15. HAWTHORN BERRY WINE
  16. LOGANBERRY WINE
  17. MIXED FRESH FRUIT WINE
  18. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  19. MULBERRY WINE
  20. PARSLEY WINE
  21. PEACH WINE
  22. PEACH PULP WINE
  23. PEA POD WINE
  24. PLUM WINE 1
  25. PLUM WINE 2
  26. RAISIN WINE
  27. REDCURRANT WINE
  28. RHUBARB WINE
  29. SLOE WINE
  30. SPINACH WINE
  31. TOMATO WINE
  32. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  1. APRICOT PULP WINE
  2. BANANA WINE
  3. BEETROOT WINE
  4. BLACKBERRY WINE
  5. BRANDY WINE
  6. BULLACE WINE
  7. CARROT WINE
  8. CHERRY "BRANDY"
  9. CHERRY WINE
  10. CHERRY PLUM WINE
  11. COFFEE WINE
  12. DAMSON "CREAM"
  13. DAMSON WINE
  14. DATE WINE
  15. ELDERBERRY WINE
  16. DRIED ELDERBERRY AND BILBERRY WINE
  17. FIG WINE
  18. GINGER WINE
  19. LOGANBERRY WINE
  20. MULBERRY WINE
  21. ORANGE WINE
  22. PARSNIP WINE
  23. RAISIN WINE
  24. ROSE-HIP WINE
  25. DRIED ROSE-HIP WINE
  26. SLOE WINE
  27. SULTANA WINE
  1. FLOWER WINES
  2. ALMOND WINE
  3. CRAB-APPLE WINE
  4. MAIZE WINE
  5. MANGOLD WINE
  6. MARROW WINE
  7. MEDLAR WINE
  8. MIXED FRUIT WINE
  9. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  10. PEACH WINE
  11. PEAR WINE
  12. PRUNE WINE
  13. QUINCE WINE
  14. RASPBERRY WINE
  15. RHUBARB WINE
  16. RICE AND RAISIN WINE
  17. SULTANA WINE
  18. SPICED APPLE WINE
  19. TEA WINE
  20. VINE FOLLY WINE
  21. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  22. DRIED WHORTLEBERRYWINE
  1. MARROW RUM
  2. CHOKE CHERRY
  3. BLUE BERRY
  4. APPLE WINE 1
  5. WATER MELON WINE
  6. TOMATO WINE
  7.  

 

CIDER

Many good brands of cider are available everywhere and occasionally one can find vintage cider and even cask cider which is a superb drink in the right circumstances. If you like cider you may be tempted to make some yourself, and the following notes will help you.

Should you live in the West of England you may be able to get hold of real cider apples. There are many varieties, and by themselves they are almost inedible. Some are very bitter, containing much tannin, some very sour containing much acid, and some very sweet. Cider makers always use a blend of apples and you should try to get some of each kind. If you can't get real cider apples use some crab apples, some sour cooking apples and some sweet eating apples. You will need at least 12 Ib. of apples to make a gallon of cider and the more soft and mellow they are the better, although they must not be bad.

Wash off any leaves and dirt and place the apples a few at a time in a plastic bag and crush them thoroughly with a mallet. Put the apples as soon as they are crushed into another plastic bag together with three or four crushed Campden tablets and a teaspoonful of Pectozyme. By this time the apple juice should be flowing and should be strained off and checked fox sugar content by means of an hydro meter. One teaspoonful of granulated yeast or better still a fermenting champagne yeast is now stirred into the juice. An air lock must immediately be put into the jar to keep out dirt and germs.

The rest of the apples must be pressed and squeezed until every last drop of juice is extracted, the juice being added to the fermentation jar as it becomes available. The reason for this is to prevent oxidising the cider through browning the apples or juice In the open air. The Campden tablets will help to prevent this and the yeast will start working as soon as the sulphur dioxide has cleared.

If you possibly can, do use a press, either your own or one that you have borrowed. If you have a juice extractor, so much, the better and use that instead, hut extract all the juice and start it fermenting as quickly as possible. Cider should start fermenting with an initial gravity of 1.070, so if your apples are not quite sweet enough add some sugar. A quick rule-of-thumb measurement is 1 oz. of sugar raises the gravity in a gallon of must by two degrees, B Ib. of sugar then will raise the S.G. of apple juice from, say, 1.054 to 1.070. As the apples will vary widely in sweetness, no guide can be given as to how much sugar to add. You must check the juice with an hydrometer and add sugar as may be necessary.

The teaspoonful of Pectozyme will be most helpful in clearing the cider from an excess of pectin which might otherwise cause a haze.

When fermentation has ceased rack the cider into a clean jar in which a crushed Campden tablet has already been dropped. This will again prevent the cider from oxidising, which it dues very readily. After another six weeks the cider should be clear and may he bottled. If you want a still cider sack it into ordinary bottles and cork it. If you want a sparkling cider add a small teaspoonful of sugar per pint, use a screw-stoppered bottle and mature for six weeks. Cider is generally ready after three or four months and because it is low in alcohol does not usually keep much beyond nine or ten months.