A Very Ancient Craft

Preparation

Equipment

Method

Fermentation

Maturation

Consumption

Beer, Mead and so on

  1. BASIC BEER RECIPE
  2. BEN'S BEST BITTER
  3. COCK ALE
  4. STOUT
  5. MILK STOUT
  6. BROWN ALE
  7. OLD ALE
  8. MILD ALE
  9. TREACLE ALE
  10. NETTLE
  11. HONEY BEER
  12. GINGER BEER
  13. GINGER BEER 2
  14. CIDER
  15. PERRY
  16. PUNCH
  17. MEAD
  18. TABLE MEAD
  19. DESSERT MEAD
  20. SPARKLING MEAD
  21. METHEGLIN
  22. PYMENT
  23. HYPOCRAS
  24. MELOMEL
  25. CYSER

Wine Recipes

  1. GRAPEFRUIT WINE
  2. LEMON WINE
  3. ORANGE WINE
  4. PINEAPPLE WINE
  5. ROSE-HIP AND FIG WINE
  1. SPARKLING APPLE WINE
  2. SPARKLING PEAR WINE
  3. SPARKLING GOOSEBERRY WINE
  1. APPLE WINE
  2. APRICOT WINE 1
  3. APRICOT WINE 2
  4. ARTICHOKE WINE
  5. BILBERRY WINE
  6. BIRCH SAP WINE
  7. BLACKBERRY WINE
  8. BRAMBLE TIP WINE
  9. BROAD BEAN WINE
  10. CELERY WINE
  11. CHERRY WINE
  12. CYPRIOT GRAPE WINE
  13. ENGLISH GRAPE VINE
  14. GOOSEBERRY WINE
  15. HAWTHORN BERRY WINE
  16. LOGANBERRY WINE
  17. MIXED FRESH FRUIT WINE
  18. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  19. MULBERRY WINE
  20. PARSLEY WINE
  21. PEACH WINE
  22. PEACH PULP WINE
  23. PEA POD WINE
  24. PLUM WINE 1
  25. PLUM WINE 2
  26. RAISIN WINE
  27. REDCURRANT WINE
  28. RHUBARB WINE
  29. SLOE WINE
  30. SPINACH WINE
  31. TOMATO WINE
  32. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  1. APRICOT PULP WINE
  2. BANANA WINE
  3. BEETROOT WINE
  4. BLACKBERRY WINE
  5. BRANDY WINE
  6. BULLACE WINE
  7. CARROT WINE
  8. CHERRY "BRANDY"
  9. CHERRY WINE
  10. CHERRY PLUM WINE
  11. COFFEE WINE
  12. DAMSON "CREAM"
  13. DAMSON WINE
  14. DATE WINE
  15. ELDERBERRY WINE
  16. DRIED ELDERBERRY AND BILBERRY WINE
  17. FIG WINE
  18. GINGER WINE
  19. LOGANBERRY WINE
  20. MULBERRY WINE
  21. ORANGE WINE
  22. PARSNIP WINE
  23. RAISIN WINE
  24. ROSE-HIP WINE
  25. DRIED ROSE-HIP WINE
  26. SLOE WINE
  27. SULTANA WINE
  1. FLOWER WINES
  2. ALMOND WINE
  3. CRAB-APPLE WINE
  4. MAIZE WINE
  5. MANGOLD WINE
  6. MARROW WINE
  7. MEDLAR WINE
  8. MIXED FRUIT WINE
  9. MIXED DRIED FRUIT WINE
  10. PEACH WINE
  11. PEAR WINE
  12. PRUNE WINE
  13. QUINCE WINE
  14. RASPBERRY WINE
  15. RHUBARB WINE
  16. RICE AND RAISIN WINE
  17. SULTANA WINE
  18. SPICED APPLE WINE
  19. TEA WINE
  20. VINE FOLLY WINE
  21. WHORTLEBERRY WINE
  22. DRIED WHORTLEBERRYWINE
  1. MARROW RUM
  2. CHOKE CHERRY
  3. BLUE BERRY
  4. APPLE WINE 1
  5. WATER MELON WINE
  6. TOMATO WINE
  7.  

 

BASIC BEER RECIPE

 

1 Ib. extract of malt

1 oz. hops

1/2 Ib. sugar

1 gallon water

This is a very simple beer to make and the results are guaranteed to please. The extract of malt is obtainable from Boots the Chemists, among others, and also from the usual suppliers listed in the appendix. The hops are equally readily available from Boots or from the suppliers. The sugar will no doubt already be in the home and the best yeast to use is the granulated variety made by Allinson's.

The sugar and malt are dissolved in a quart of tepid water while the hops are being boiled for ten minutes in another quart of water. The hop liquor is then strained on to the male and sugar solution and then the hops are again boiled in another quart of water for a further ten minutes. This liquor is also strained on to the wort and the hops are boiled fox the third time in a final quart of water. When this, too, has been added to the wort it is covered to keep out the dust and placed somewhere to cool. It is often convenient to leave it overnight. Next morning a teaspoonful of granulated yeast is sprinkled on the top of the wort and fermentation will begin within a few hours. The yeast can, of course, be started earlier in a little of the malt solution, which has been quickly cooled, so that it is already fermenting when added to the main brew.

It is worth while saving a few of the hops to add dry to the wort at this stage, since this sharpens the flavour of the finished beer. After three days' fermentation skim off the scum that has arisen and leave the beer to finish fermenting right out. If you are using a hydrometer a recommended starting gravity is from 1.036 to 1.040. This will ferment, or attenuate as it is called in brewing, down to 1.004 or lower. The gallon of beer should now be strained into eight clean screw-stoppered beer bottles, each being filled to about 1 1/2 in. from the bottom of the screw. A small teaspoonful of sugar must now be added as priming to each bottle and the stoppers screwed in firmly. Corks and ordinary bottles are useless for beer making. The corks permit the admission of too much, air and a skin forms on top of the beer, which loses its life and looks and tastes flat and lifeless. There is also a danger that the bottle may burst under the pressure of the carbon-dioxide gas formed during the bottle fermentation of the priming sugar.

The beer quickly clears to brilliance in a week and the yeast deposit settles firmly on the bottom of the bottle. It is fully matured in two weeks and ready for drinking. If it is cooled in the refrigerator for a short while before serving at about 55"F. it will pour easily and cleanly from the bottle without the sediment rising. The bottle should be handled carefully so as not to shake up the deposit, and all the glasses and mugs into which it is to be poured should be stood together. When the stopper is unscrewed the beer should be steadily poured slowly down the side of each glass in such a manner that the bottle does not have to be moved from its horizontal position until the last of the beer has been poured. In this way it is perfectly possible to pour out all the beer clear and bright, leaving no more than a quarter to half an inch of lees in the bottle.

This priming is all-important to the finished beer. Insufficient sugar means that the beer will have a poor head of froth, if any, and that the beer will not have enough twinkling bubbles of carbon dioxide rising to the top whilst it is being drunk; it will taste soft and rather lifeless. Too much priming sugar, on the other hand, causes so much additional carbon dioxide to be formed that when the stopper is unscrewed there will be an almighty gush of froth and Ices over everyone and everything. It will be quite impossible to pour out a glass of drinkable beer. It is better at first slightly to under-prime than to over-prime and it: is always safest to let the beer ferment right out before bottling. Otherwise there will not only be the priming sugar to ferment in the bottle, but the residue of sugar in the wort. Don't bottle too early, then, and don't add more than a small teaspoonful of priming sugar per pint.

Various suppliers sell ready-made packs of ingredients, which only require water and sugar to be added, but there is no recipe simpler than the one above and none surer of pleasing. It has been tested successfully many thousands of times by countless people.

It is not difficult, of course, to vary this recipe in many different ways to secure variations of texture and taste to suit different palates and occasions. A few of the most effective are given, but you can make up others if you feel so inclined by varying the quantities of each ingredient in an almost endless permutation.